Shun, Shibui, and Shojin Ryori

Seasonality, simplicity, and spirituality. 

It would be a mistake to say that Ephemeral adheres to the aforementioned Japanese philosophies; after all, many have devoted their lives into the study of these philosophies without thinking that they have reached understanding. Since we can only coin these terms with superficial appreciation for their profound meaning - our mission is to learn about these philosophies through practice.

 

 Courtesy of doyouknowjapan.com

Courtesy of doyouknowjapan.com

Shun(): Seasonality is the central aspect of Washoku (Traditional Japanese Cuisine). Seasonality can be determined through a produce's yield volume, size or quality. Plants and fishes alike are to be consumed in their peak seasons, which is only natural centuries before food preservation was possible. The connection to nature through dining experience is to be achieved through a successful presentation of seasonality.

 Kaiseki at Kikunoi - Courtesy of Kikunoi.jp

Kaiseki at Kikunoi - Courtesy of Kikunoi.jp

Shibui(渋い):Simple yet complex. Japanese aesthetics discourse is, to a great extent, characterised through minimalism. It is where simplicity, devoid of the unnecessary, disguises the subtle and complex. One shall not deform and modify but rather accentuate the character and the essence of the object of attention through discarding all elements deemed extraneous while still giving the minute yet pivotal touches. 

 Courtesy of japanese.people.com.cn

Courtesy of japanese.people.com.cn

Shojin Ryori(精進料理): Temple cuisine or Buddhist cuisine is vegan by nature. Veganism has also served as the foundation of Japanese cuisine. Although Ephemeral is committed to Omakase Sushi dinners where the seasonality of fishes takes precedence, there is a monthly Shojin Ryori dinner that takes place. We believe that revisiting the very roots of the cuisine can advance our understanding of our cuisine and the Japanese approach.